All I ask is a tall ship…

I must go down to the seas again
to the lonely sea and sky
And all I ask is a tall ship
and a star to steer her by
And the wheel’s kick and the wind’s song
and the white sail’s shaking
And a gray mist on the sea’s face,
and a gray dawn breaking.

I must go down to the seas again
for the call of the running tide
Is a wild call and a clear call
That may not be denied
And all I ask is a windy day
with the white clouds flying
And the flung spray and the blown spume
and the sea-gulls crying.

I must go down to the seas again
to the vagrant gypsy life
To the gull’s way and the whale’s way
where the wind’s like a whetted knife
And all I ask is a merry yarn
from a laughing fellow-rover
And quiet sleep and a sweet dream
when the long trick’s over.

Sea Fever
By John Masefield

Mr. Masefield, I’m getting a bit squirrely myself. I think it’s in part because I’m getting so close to done. Today I finished the majority of the shaping of my mast, only to find the top 10-12″ of the beam had a split in the middle! After uttering a long string of words appropriate for a sailor, I glued and clamped it down. The hope is that it’ll hold strong. Worst case scenario: It splits, and I end up building a new one. (Or putting a hose clamp on it!)

Cleaned up a lot of the excess wood from the starboard airbox. It took a pass with the pull-saw to get the big stuff gone, then the block plane and surform tool. After being so productive, it seemed like a good time for ‘selfies’!

Dust mask? Check. Surform tool? Check. Sweet Vice City t-shirt? Check.  Yes, I rule.

Dust mask? Check. Surform tool? Check. Sweet Vice City t-shirt? Check.
Yes, I rule.

The block plane deserved recognition too…

Block plane and I totally getting photo-bombed by my mast hanging there.

Block plane and I totally getting photo-bombed by my mast hanging there.

A bunch of progress on the rudder! I liked this rudder Shorty had posted about here. It’s very similar to what my old Weekender 18′ had. Here’s a mock-up of the rudder and tiller.
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It took a bit to find something to use as the bumper. After digging around the miscellaneous parts jars, the solution presented itself in the form of an old bicycle brake pad and a deadbolt latch plate. The plate was hammered into position, and screwed to the board. Then the brake was screwed to it. Moral of the story: Junk bins rule.
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Using a piece of scrap as a tiller, it’s ready to be bolted on tomorrow (or Friday, whenever I get back to it), hooray!

Last but not least, the hull plate arrived. It seemed only right to support the Puddle Duck class. If buying a hull plate was a way to do that, I’d do it. I fired up the DYMO-MITE Tapewriter and made a fairly awesome hull plate.

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